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Phoobear7
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« on: August 07, 2018, 11:42:36 AM »

Hi from the UK

Looking for tips on our holiday next year in
Oct or Nov for 6 days looking for budget hotels
All help appreciated
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TsuDoNihm
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« Reply #1 on: August 07, 2018, 12:38:42 PM »

 Welcome to LVAdvice

I'm sure many people will be willing to help you plan your trip but the more information you can give us the better we can help.

Have you been to Vegas before?  Is so, where did you stay and what did you like or dislike?

Are you going primarily to gamble or are you more interested in other things?  If other things, what kind of activities most interest you?

Do you plan on renting a car?  The quality of your experience will differ greatly depending if you are in an area where transportation isn't an issue, (like the strip), or in a more remote location where a car is almost mandatory.

If you can answer some of those questions then people can make suggestions.

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Phoobear7
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« Reply #2 on: August 07, 2018, 01:46:03 PM »

We are hoping to visit LV7 days SF 5days ,NY 5days next Nov 2019  looks promising, all in 3weeks we have a rough intinary for all, we are not gamblers but was just love to visit LV for the experience also SF and NY.
We do not drive. For LV thinking of
Day 1 Bus tour/walk the strip limited options depends on arrival
Day 2 Lo s Angeles and Hollywood day trip
Day 3 Chill day
Day 4 ATV ride Mojave desert/
Day 5 Grand Canyon VIP tour
Day 6 Chill? Show at night
All can be changed accordingly
Thank you all
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uknowme
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« Reply #3 on: August 07, 2018, 02:45:54 PM »

A day trip to LA is going to be 90% driving.  I wouldn't do it.  I'd spend the day/night in downtown Las Vegas instead. 

On a side note, were Phoobear 1-6 already taken?
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knagl
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« Reply #4 on: August 07, 2018, 11:40:20 PM »

Welcome to the site, Phoobear7!

As unknowme said above, a trip to Los Angeles or Hollywood is going to require more than a day, even if you were to fly there and back to Las Vegas.  It's 435 km (270 miles) each way between Las Vegas and Los Angeles, and LA is known for its horrible traffic.

As far as "budget hotels", be aware that most Las Vegas hotels now charge a "resort fee", which is a hidden way for them to increase the cost of a hotel room.  For example, MGM Grand may advertise a room rate of $79 per night, but there's a mandatory $37/night "resort fee" on top of that, plus tax, meaning your $79 room actually costs more than $120 a night.  Over multiple nights, that resort fee really adds up.

There are two somewhat desirable hotels in the tourist districts that give you the ability to avoid the resort fees.

Treasure Island, located on the strip (decent location, too) has a "TV Ad Special" rate on their website.  That rate (and only that rate) allows you to opt-out of the resort fee.  Any other rates booked on their website do incur a (currently) $35/night resort fee.  Look specifically for the TV Ad Special rate on their website: http://www.treasureisland.com/special-offers#tv-ad-special

The Four Queens, located on Fremont Street downtown, does not charge a resort fee -- they are the lone holdout that doesn't charge one downtown.  Their website is: http://www.fourqueens.com/

Note, it's simply too early to reserve rooms for October 2019 -- you'll likely need to wait until January 2019 or later.  I would also recommend booking directly with the hotel via their website, as you can cancel your reservation and re-book if prices drop between the time you originally book and the date of your trip.
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Phoobear7
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« Reply #5 on: August 08, 2018, 05:35:15 PM »

A day trip to LA is going to be 90% driving.  I wouldn't do it.  I'd spend the day/night in downtown Las Vegas instead. 

On a side note, were Phoobear 1-6 already taken?
Welcome to the site, Phoobear7!

As unknowme said above, a trip to Los Angeles or Hollywood is going to require more than a day, even if you were to fly there and back to Las Vegas.  It's 435 km (270 miles) each way between Las Vegas and Los Angeles, and LA is known for its horrible traffic.

As far as "budget hotels", be aware that most Las Vegas hotels now charge a "resort fee", which is a hidden way for them to increase the cost of a hotel room.  For example, MGM Grand may advertise a room rate of $79 per night, but there's a mandatory $37/night "resort fee" on top of that, plus tax, meaning your $79 room actually costs more than $120 a night.  Over multiple nights, that resort fee really adds up.

There are two somewhat desirable hotels in the tourist districts that give you the ability to avoid the resort fees.

Treasure Island, located on the strip (decent location, too) has a "TV Ad Special" rate on their website.  That rate (and only that rate) allows you to opt-out of the resort fee.  Any other rates booked on their website do incur a (currently) $35/night resort fee.  Look specifically for the TV Ad Special rate on their website: http://www.treasureisland.com/special-offers#tv-ad-special

The Four Queens, located on Fremont Street downtown, does not charge a resort fee -- they are the lone holdout that doesn't charge one downtown.  Their website is: http://www.fourqueens.com/

Note, it's simply too early to reserve rooms for October 2019 -- you'll likely need to wait until January 2019 or later.  I would also recommend booking directly with the hotel via their website, as you can cancel your reservation and re-book if prices drop between the time you originally book and the date of your trip.
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Phoobear7
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« Reply #6 on: August 08, 2018, 05:37:11 PM »

Hi not sure who in particular who i am replying to, not familiar with replying to posts, thank u all for the great advice which I will fully note
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knagl
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« Reply #7 on: August 09, 2018, 12:05:44 AM »

Hi not sure who in particular who i am replying to, not familiar with replying to posts, thank u all for the great advice which I will fully note

No problem, you're doing fine!  Let us know if you have any more questions about your upcoming trip.  We're a helpful bunch.  Yes
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StatFreak
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« Reply #8 on: August 10, 2018, 06:19:57 PM »

I agree with the Los Angeles assessments here. Not only is travel (air or ground) going to consume a day, but LA requires a lot more time to visit. Universal Studios/Universal City walk would consume a day in itself. Another for Hollywood boulevard and vicinity. Disneyland (60-120 minutes south, depending on traffic) is an entirely different can of worms, requiring multiple days and lots of extra cash. And there is a lot more to see than the iceberg tip I've mentioned...



On to SF. I'd recommend staying near fisherman's wharf if you can, or maybe the Hyatt Regency in the Embarcadero. There are fisherman's wharf and the piers in and around pier 39, a Bay cruise starting from the same area, riding the obligatory cable car from there to see Union Square and downtown Market street and back again. Don't forget to visit Chinatown and possibly the lesser-known Japan town. You could walk across, or at least out onto the Golden Gate bridge (if you're up for it) and definitely visit Fort Point underneath the bridge.

There's Coit Tower and that one twisted block of Lombard street (with the 30 to 45 minute multiple-block line of cars waiting to drive it), the Haight-Ashbury district and the head of Golden Gate park near there. Continuing westward through the park from that starting point, there is the large conservatory, then The Academy of Sciences and the De Young museum, across from one another in GG park at around 10th Avenue and the Japanese tea garden in the same area. There are still more places of interest in the park. A tour of Alcatraz would be on my list. Those also originate from the pier area. You might consider a visit to Angel Island but you probably won't have time.. And we haven't left the city yet.

In Marin county, just north of the bridge, there's Sausalito, Tiburon (which you can just view from afar when in Sausalito, lol.) and Muir woods (highly recommended). You can either drive to Sausalito or take a ferry from the aforementioned pier area, which affords another chance to get out on the bay. I think Muir woods requires a car unless there is some tour bus company running out there that I don't know of, which is very possible.

Depending on your willingness to travel, there's the Napa Valley wine country corridor to the north, including St. Helena and Calistoga. The center of the valley is between 50 (80km) to 70 miles (112 km) from SF, depending on which way you go and requires about 2.5 hours travel each way. Since you don't drive, you'd have to find a wine tasting or similar tour but that shouldn't be difficult.

To the south on the coast, Half Moon bay is only about 10 miles (16km) away. Santa Cruise is about 80 miles (130km) and two hours south. Farther south, about 120 miles (195km) from SF, you'll find the Monterey Bay aquarium, Carmel by the Sea and Pebble Beach. Hearst Castle is 250 miles (400km) south and basically half way to LA. Each of these destinations aside from Half Moon Bay would require a full day at least and probably won't make your itinerary but are worth considering.



Vegas. I suggest staying center Strip if you're a first timer. The rest of us get over the strip but it really is something to experience if you've never been here. Don't miss the downtown Fremont Street Experience area and come at night to see at least one or two canopy light shows, which run at the top of each hour in the evenings. If you watch TV and are interested, the Pawn Stars shop is not far from downtown on Las Vegas Blvd and there is a loop shuttle bus that will take you there. To be honest, it's mostly a tourist trap gift shop but there are some of the items from the series on display in glass cases.

You should see the Bellagio conservatory and watch the fountain show out front on the Strip. Definitely book at least one (or two) Cirque Du Soleil shows. Mystere and Love are favorites. Look for discount tickets. You can view the strip from the Linq High Roller or the entire valley from an even greater height by visiting the Stratosphere tower. Tip: They charge to go up to the top but not if you go to the bar or the restaurant and once you're up there, you're up there and free to change floors Wink. You can also pay for a package that includes some/all of the rides at the top if you like that sort of thing.

You've already mentioned the Grand Canyon and that's a definite must-see, but don't forget Hoover Dam. It's also worth a visit and there are bus tours, but try to arrange an inside tour of the dam if you can. It's worth it. I recommend the longer "hard hat" tour.

Out of town we have nearby Red Rock canyon which is very popular. Mt. Charleston and the Valley of Fire are farther away in different directions and are about an hour northwest and northeast of Vegas respectively. The Valley of fire is more spectacular than Red Rock (with my apologies to Red Rock) but not having a car will make visits to these places difficult.
« Last Edit: August 10, 2018, 06:27:19 PM by StatFreak » Logged

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deannajs
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« Reply #9 on: August 10, 2018, 07:27:12 PM »

Statfreak has given you some excellent advice. I hope you are taking notes!
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Phoobear7
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« Reply #10 on: August 11, 2018, 06:24:30 PM »

Welcome to the site, Phoobear7!

As unknowme said above, a trip to Los Angeles or Hollywood is going to require more than a day, even if you were to fly there and back to Las Vegas.  It's 435 km (270 miles) each way between Las Vegas and Los Angeles, and LA is known for its horrible traffic.

As far as "budget hotels", be aware that most Las Vegas hotels now charge a "resort fee", which is a hidden way for them to increase the cost of a hotel room.  For example, MGM Grand may advertise a room rate of $79 per night, but there's a mandatory $37/night "resort fee" on top of that, plus tax, meaning your $79 room actually costs more than $120 a night.  Over multiple nights, that resort fee really adds up.

There are two somewhat desirable hotels in the tourist districts that give you the ability to avoid the resort fees.

Treasure Island, located on the strip (decent location, too) has a "TV Ad Special" rate on their website.  That rate (and only that rate) allows you to opt-out of the resort fee.  Any other rates booked on their website do incur a (currently) $35/night resort fee.  Look specifically for the TV Ad Special rate on their website: http://www.treasureisland.com/special-offers#tv-ad-special

The Four Queens, located on Fremont Street downtown, does not charge a resort fee -- they are the lone holdout that doesn't charge one downtown.  Their website is: http://www.fourqueens.com/

Note, it's simply too early to reserve rooms for October 2019 -- you'll likely need to wait until January 2019 or later.  I would also recommend booking directly with the hotel via their website, as you can cancel your reservation and re-book if prices drop between the time you originally book and the date of your trip.
Statfreak has given you some excellent advice. I hope you are taking notes!
Welcome to the site, Phoobear7!

As unknowme said above, a trip to Los Angeles or Hollywood is going to require more than a day, even if you were to fly there and back to Las Vegas.  It's 435 km (270 miles) each way between Las Vegas and Los Angeles, and LA is known for its horrible traffic.

As far as "budget hotels", be aware that most Las Vegas hotels now charge a "resort fee", which is a hidden way for them to increase the cost of a hotel room.  For example, MGM Grand may advertise a room rate of $79 per night, but there's a mandatory $37/night "resort fee" on top of that, plus tax, meaning your $79 room actually costs more than $120 a night.  Over multiple nights, that resort fee really adds up.

There are two somewhat desirable hotels in the tourist districts that give you the ability to avoid the resort fees.

Treasure Island, located on the strip (decent location, too) has a "TV Ad Special" rate on their website.  That rate (and only that rate) allows you to opt-out of the resort fee.  Any other rates booked on their website do incur a (currently) $35/night resort fee.  Look specifically for the TV Ad Special rate on their website: http://www.treasureisland.com/special-offers#tv-ad-special

The Four Queens, located on Fremont Street downtown, does not charge a resort fee -- they are the lone holdout that doesn't charge one downtown.  Their website is: http://www.fourqueens.com/

Note, it's simply too early to reserve rooms for October 2019 -- you'll likely need to wait until January 2019 or later.  I would also recommend booking directly with the hotel via their website, as you can cancel your reservation and re-book if prices drop between the time you originally book and the date of your trip.
I agree with the Los Angeles assessments here. Not only is travel (air or ground) going to consume a day, but LA requires a lot more time to visit. Universal Studios/Universal City walk would consume a day in itself. Another for Hollywood boulevard and vicinity. Disneyland (60-120 minutes south, depending on traffic) is an entirely different can of worms, requiring multiple days and lots of extra cash. And there is a lot more to see than the iceberg tip I've mentioned...



On to SF. I'd recommend staying near fisherman's wharf if you can, or maybe the Hyatt Regency in the Embarcadero. There are fisherman's wharf and the piers in and around pier 39, a Bay cruise starting from the same area, riding the obligatory cable car from there to see Union Square and downtown Market street and back again. Don't forget to visit Chinatown and possibly the lesser-known Japan town. You could walk across, or at least out onto the Golden Gate bridge (if you're up for it) and definitely visit Fort Point underneath the bridge.

There's Coit Tower and that one twisted block of Lombard street (with the 30 to 45 minute multiple-block line of cars waiting to drive it), the Haight-Ashbury district and the head of Golden Gate park near there. Continuing westward through the park from that starting point, there is the large conservatory, then The Academy of Sciences and the De Young museum, across from one another in GG park at around 10th Avenue and the Japanese tea garden in the same area. There are still more places of interest in the park. A tour of Alcatraz would be on my list. Those also originate from the pier area. You might consider a visit to Angel Island but you probably won't have time.. And we haven't left the city yet.

In Marin county, just north of the bridge, there's Sausalito, Tiburon (which you can just view from afar when in Sausalito, lol.) and Muir woods (highly recommended). You can either drive to Sausalito or take a ferry from the aforementioned pier area, which affords another chance to get out on the bay. I think Muir woods requires a car unless there is some tour bus company running out there that I don't know of, which is very possible.

Depending on your willingness to travel, there's the Napa Valley wine country corridor to the north, including St. Helena and Calistoga. The center of the valley is between 50 (80km) to 70 miles (112 km) from SF, depending on which way you go and requires about 2.5 hours travel each way. Since you don't drive, you'd have to find a wine tasting or similar tour but that shouldn't be difficult.

To the south on the coast, Half Moon bay is only about 10 miles (16km) away. Santa Cruise is about 80 miles (130km) and two hours south. Farther south, about 120 miles (195km) from SF, you'll find the Monterey Bay aquarium, Carmel by the Sea and Pebble Beach. Hearst Castle is 250 miles (400km) south and basically half way to LA. Each of these destinations aside from Half Moon Bay would require a full day at least and probably won't make your itinerary but are worth considering.



Vegas. I suggest staying center Strip if you're a first timer. The rest of us get over the strip but it really is something to experience if you've never been here. Don't miss the downtown Fremont Street Experience area and come at night to see at least one or two canopy light shows, which run at the top of each hour in the evenings. If you watch TV and are interested, the Pawn Stars shop is not far from downtown on Las Vegas Blvd and there is a loop shuttle bus that will take you there. To be honest, it's mostly a tourist trap gift shop but there are some of the items from the series on display in glass cases.

You should see the Bellagio conservatory and watch the fountain show out front on the Strip. Definitely book at least one (or two) Cirque Du Soleil shows. Mystere and Love are favorites. Look for discount tickets. You can view the strip from the Linq High Roller or the entire valley from an even greater height by visiting the Stratosphere tower. Tip: They charge to go up to the top but not if you go to the bar or the restaurant and once you're up there, you're up there and free to change floors Wink. You can also pay for a package that includes some/all of the rides at the top if you like that sort of thing.

You've already mentioned the Grand Canyon and that's a definite must-see, but don't forget Hoover Dam. It's also worth a visit and there are bus tours, but try to arrange an inside tour of the dam if you can. It's worth it. I recommend the longer "hard hat" tour.

Out of town we have nearby Red Rock canyon which is very popular. Mt. Charleston and the Valley of Fire are farther away in different directions and are about an hour northwest and northeast of Vegas respectively. The Valley of fire is more spectacular than Red Rock (with my apologies to Red Rock) but not having a car will make visits to these places difficult.
Thank you for the great information and advice
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Phoobear7
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« Reply #11 on: August 11, 2018, 06:31:05 PM »

Thank you for the great information re our Lo s Angeles day trip, I stupidly did not realize the travelling time involved also the hotel advice and San Fran excellent stuff to consider. Thanks for taking the time to give me fab info.
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RecVPPlayer
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« Reply #12 on: August 13, 2018, 12:16:51 AM »

To learn a lot more about California, as well as some stuff on Las Vegas itself, at your leisure, even at home, you can check out many sites in California (including many of the ones that you and others have mentioned -- although Universal Studios is not included) by going online to the Huell Howser Archives at https://blogs.chapman.edu/huell-howser-archives/archives/

Once on the site, you can go to the Search Function and type in (for Example) "San Francisco," "Hearst Castle," "Golden Gate Bridge," "Alcatraz (Island)," "Lombard Street," and more (also "Las Vegas" -- he did a show about a "Kinder, Gentler Las Vegas" -- but know that Las Vegas has all kinds of different attractions -- more information on that is also available by at least going to the website of Las Vegas Magazine) and you should get to see shows about these different places.  Huell Howser did a lot of great stuff on TV for more than 25 years.  Unfortunately, he passed away in 2013 but the shows are still excellent.

Enjoy!
« Last Edit: August 13, 2018, 03:19:21 PM by RecVPPlayer » Logged
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